Reading Feed Tags: Part 3

In the last blog, we discussed the minerals required by a horse in large volumes such as calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and potassium. We also covered the importance of incorporating the trace minerals copper, zinc, and manganese into the diet and how organic forms of these minerals may improve absorption rates and utilization. Finally, we touched on vitamins A, D, and E. This month we will turn…

Equine Obesity

Both human and equine populations in the United States are trending toward a serious epidemic – obesity. With domestication of the horse and improvements in technology, we as horse owners and care-takers, have inadvertently subjected the equine population to “over-nutrition”. Many pastures that horses graze are well cared-for and the grasses are unlimited. Many other horses are fed the mo…

Senior Horse Nutrition

More than 15 percent of the U.S. equine population is older than 20 with many still participating in athletic activities. With so many of today’s horses living and working into their late 20's and even 30's, it is important to adjust their nutrition programs as they age. Dental UpkeepFirst and foremost, a senior horse must be on a routine dental evaluation program. The years take a toll on a…

Feed Forms Explained

Although grass or hay is the foundation of a horse’s diet, a concentrated feed should be added to meet nutritional and energy requirements. But with the variety of feed forms available on the market, which is the best choice for your horse?Bluebonnet Feeds manufactures and sells four different forms of feed: Pelleted—Unlike many other mills that use extreme heat to manufacture pellets, Bluebonnet…

Ammonia Levels and Stalled Horses

As equine care-takers, ammonia is something that we battle on a daily basis, whether it is in stalls or in the trailer.Ammonia is that pungent odor that burns your nose, lungs, and eyes and is a result of urea,a nitrogen-containing molecule that is present in urine and feces. Urea itself is non-toxic and has nosmell, but once excreted, urea is rapidly converted to ammonia. Ammonia is very irritati…

​Ionophore Toxicity in Horses

How safe is your horse’s feed?  If the feed is milled at a plant that also manufactures livestock feed containing ionophores, there’s a risk of cross-contamination which could be fatal to your horse. Over the last several months the equine industry has been hit with the loss of multiple horses from various locations due to ionophore toxicity. Unfortunately, deaths like this occur each year…