Fetal Programming

The term ‘fetal programming’ may sound like it belongs in a science lab rather than a breeding operation, but this concept is something that breeders should take note of. Most people don’t realize it, but a developing fetus can actually adapt to external factors while in the mother’s womb, and those adaptations have a life-long effect on the baby. Development of a fetus is a complex process t…

Digestive Support for Horses: Prebiotics and Probiotics

Performance horses are subjected to stresses on a daily basis. Horse owners, in turn, do everything possible to keep them healthy and comfortable so they perform to their highest potential. Spa therapy, magnetic blankets, ceramic wraps, joint supplements, hay steamers, gel-sole booties, massage therapy, acupuncture, vibration plates, and infrared light therapy are just some of the tools profession…

Drug-Free Joint Support

Performance horses constantly battle low-grade joint inflammation caused by repeated maneuvers such as turning and stopping. This inflammation can be especially prominent in horses that work in very hard or deep ground on a daily basis. Low levels of inflammation are part of the body’s normal healing process and typically the body can clear this inflammation on its own without intervention from dr…

Ammonia Levels and Stalled Horses

As equine care-takers, ammonia is something that we battle on a daily basis, whether it is in stalls or in the trailer.Ammonia is that pungent odor that burns your nose, lungs, and eyes and is a result of urea,a nitrogen-containing molecule that is present in urine and feces. Urea itself is non-toxic and has nosmell, but once excreted, urea is rapidly converted to ammonia. Ammonia is very irritati…

Equine Obesity

Both human and equine populations in the United States are trending toward a serious epidemic – obesity. With domestication of the horse and improvements in technology, we as horse owners and care-takers, have inadvertently subjected the equine population to “over-nutrition”. Many pastures that horses graze are well cared-for and the grasses are unlimited. Many other horses are fed the mo…

Reading Feed Tags: Part 3

In the last blog, we discussed the minerals required by a horse in large volumes such as calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and potassium. We also covered the importance of incorporating the trace minerals copper, zinc, and manganese into the diet and how organic forms of these minerals may improve absorption rates and utilization. Finally, we touched on vitamins A, D, and E. This month we will turn…